Terry Scott Taylor — Video Game Music Interview (The Neverhood, Skullmonkeys & Armikrog)

Lee David Tyrrell
8 min readFeb 13, 2022

Released in 1996, The Neverhood was the first game to make use of claymation in all of its animations. Its environments burst with distinctive singularity, but the game’s popularity was boosted by its memorable puzzles and, particularly, its soundtrack. Composed by Terry Scott Taylor, a prolific songwriter and founding member of Daniel Amos, its odd vocals and playful tone were a perfect match for a world pocked with fingerprints and creativity.

Just two years later, a sequel dropped for the PlayStation. Instead of a point-and-click mystery, Skullmonkeys took the form of a platformer. Its music, also written by Taylor, followed suit with more driving beats and evolving arrangements. Lauded for its catchy themes and importance to the game’s humour, Skullmonkeys’ soundtrack may receive more retrospective attention than the game itself.

Though Taylor would go on to work on other titles, such as BoomBots, his return to the clay vistas of Armikrog — a spiritual successor to The Neverhood — was much anticipated. Driven by new environments, fresh characters and a brand new story, the results struck a slightly…

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Lee David Tyrrell

Fiction writer, mostly attracted to sci-fi and strange, experimental tangents. I’ve also worked as a music journalist for Clash, eGigs, eFestivals & C64 Audio.